Timer
Message Area
lblCurrentLayerIndex
lblCurrentImageIndex
lblFade-OutLayer
lblFade-InLayer
lblSponsorAdTimer:
lblHidCurrentSponsorAdIndex =
lblMadeItTo

  < Back to Table Of Contents  < Back to Topic: Modern vs. Vintage Farming

article number 390
article date 10-28-2014
copyright 2014 by Author else SaltOfAmerica
You Also Raised Horses, Hogs, Sheep and Jack Asses, Missouri 1904
by Walter Williams
   

From the 1904 book, The State of Missouri, an Autobiography. This book was commissioned for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition by the State of Missouri.

§

The records of the American Saddle Horse Association show that there are 1,028 saddle horses recorded in the United States. Of this number 686 are registered from Missouri. This is 23 per cent of all the registered saddle horses in America.

Exclusive of Kentucky, Missouri has more registered saddle horses than all the other States combined.

Of the original foundation of the American saddle horse breed, Missouri furnished some of the most important sires. Two Missouri horses, especially, appear frequently in the pedigrees of the best saddle horses. These are Vernon’s Roebuck and Pat Cleburne.

From these two noted animals, and a large number of lesser fame, have sprung the Missouri saddle horses.

   
DISTRIBUTION OF REGISTERED SADDLE HORSES. FROM THE AMERICAN SADDLE HORSE REGISTER.

An event of unusual importance to the saddle horse breeding industry in Missouri happened in 1886 when L. D. Morris, Clark Potts, R. W. Edmondson, Jack Harrison, and G. Tom King brought four great saddle stallions from Kentucky. These animals, Black Squirrel, Moss Rose, Artist Montrose, and Mark Diamond, have left an ineffaceable impress upon the saddle horse stock of the State.

These great sires have given Missouri an enviable reputation for high class saddle animals throughout the United States. Another horse whose value it is impossible to measure, was Old Montrose, who was used in the State for breeding purposes from 1880 to 1893, inclusive.

Some of the men who have sold animals of high merit at large prices are Jeff Bridgeford, R. T. McElroy, T. R. Jones, Dr. S. Maddox, George Nicholson, and John Harrison.

One of the most successful breeders of saddle horses in the State is John Harrison, of Auxvasse. He has sold 800 saddle horses—an average of forty a year. Some of the great horses that he has sold were Rex Denmark, $1,665; Montrose, $1,450; Red Rose, $1,250; Star Rose, $1,100, and Chimes, $1,125

In his twenty years’ experience as an exhibitor of saddle horses, he has won 1,600 prizes and $20,000 in prize money. In the year 1890 he won 250 first prizes and $5,300 in prize money. It is believed that this breeder, during the years of 1886 to 1893, had the largest herd of brood mares of the American Saddle Horse breed of any breeder in the world.

Another gentleman whose successful career as a saddle horse breeder has perhaps been unexcelled in any State or country is that of Jeff Bridgeford. This gentleman has sold 250 head of saddle horses for $100,000.

   
HORSES OWNED BY J. H. PARKER, UNIONVILLE.

George Nicholson, of Fulton, has been a breeder of saddle horses for twenty-five years. Two horses, La Rose and King La Rose, owned by this gentleman, sold for a $1,500 and $1,250, respectively. La Rose took first and King La Rose took second at the World’s Fair in Chicago for three-year-old saddle horses.

One of his mares has produced thirteen colts, valued at $4,000. This mare is still (1904) alive.

Another successful breeder is Dr. S. Maddox, of Ely. A very successful handler of horses, especially saddle horses, is Ben R. Middleton, of Mexico, a picture of whose horses accompany this article.

At the World’s Fair in Chicago there were 37 saddle horses entered for competition. Fourteen of these were from Missouri, fifteen from Kentucky, and eight from all other States. Of the five herds entered, two were from Missouri.

The saddle horse breeders who won important prizes in this event were J. A. Potts, who won first on stallion four-years-old and under five; E. L. Parrish, of St. Louis, first on three-year-old stallion; T. S. Harrison, of Auxvasse, first on three-year-old mare; and A. F. Wychoff, of Appleton City, first and sweepstakes on stallion, any age.

Besides this, a large number of second and smaller prizes were awarded to Missouri breeders. The special premium for gentleman displaying the best horsemanship in the saddle was awarded to Jeff Bridgeford, of Paris, Missouri.

   
JEFF BRIDGEFORD, AGED 81 YEARS, ON ARTIST MONTROSE—WON FIRST PRIZE AS GENTLEMAN RIDER AT CHICAGO WORLD’S FAIR, AT AGE OF 70 YEARS.

Summing up all the prizes taken by Missouri at the Chicago World’s Fair, we find that she won three firsts, one first and sweepstakes and seven seconds, a total of eleven first and second prizes. Kentucky at the same fair won four firsts and two seconds, a total of six first and second prizes.

At the St. Louis Fair, which has always been a Mecca for the saddle horse exhibitors of the south and west, Missouri won first and sweepstakes prizes, 12 out of 14 times. Some of the horses that helped to win these honors for Missouri were Mark Diamond, Old Montrose, Moss Rose, Rex Diamond, Miss Rex, and Rex McDonald.

Rex McDonald is one of the greatest living saddle horses. He was bred by Joseph McDonald, of Mexico, Missouri. His sire was Rex Denmark. He has won first and sweepstakes every year shown at St. Louis from 1894 to 1903.

   
REX MCDONALD, KING OF SADDLE STALLIONS.

Other breeders of saddle horses are, A. B. Hughes, W. E. Cone, Hanson J. Marks, R. P. Moore, W. E. Cheatham, C. F. Clark, G. Tom King, L. M. Monsees & Son, A. F. Wykoff, D. P. Ewing, S. W. Roberts, Moss A. Robertson, E. S. Stewart, A. F. Styles, Thomas Bass, J. A. Potts.

Missouri has long enjoyed an enviable reputation as an important source of light horses. Many of the substantial citizens of the State were pioneers from the blue grass regions of Kentucky.

These early settlers brought with them the Kentuckian’s love for good horses and his skill in breeding fine stock. Thus we find nowhere else better specimens of the American saddle horse, the standard-bred horse, and the thoroughbred, than in Missouri.

Two of the four purchasing stations for government horses are in Missouri, one at St. Louis and one at Kansas City. The hard dense bone which is necessary for the successful trials of speed is characteristic of the horses pastured on the limestone soils of Missouri.

There are some very large breeders of standard-bred horses in the State who have been unusually successful. One of the oldest and most distinguished of these is Col. Ryland Todhunter, of Greystone Park, Lexington, Missouri. This gentleman has been breeding standard-bred horses for fifty years and has sold in that time animals to the value of more than $100,000.

Some of the famous horses sold by this breeder are Star Wilkes, $6,000; Idol, $5,000; Lady Thorn $5,000; Merchant, $2,500, and Ashland Chief, $2,500. This breeder’s famous stallion, Star Wilkes, in one year produced colts valued at $33,000.

At the Kansas City Fair in 1877, horses from this farm won first premium on stallion over all ages and breeds, first premium for best mare and first premium for best weanling colt.

   
SADDLE HORSE—B. R. MIDDLETON, MEXICO.

Another farm that has produced good trotting horses for twenty years is Spring Lawn Farm, owned by H. J. Shelpman. This farm has sold 95 registered horses for $28,500. Two horses bred on this farm, Trumpeter and Gilberd’s Sprague, sold for $1,200 and $1,050, respectively. This establishment has won $12,500 in premiums at the various State and local fairs.

It is estimated that the best stallion owned by this farm produced 500 colts which, at a conservative estimate, are valued at $125,000.

Another Missouri breeder of note is B. F. Swaggard, of Sweet Springs, Missouri. This gentleman has had eighteen years’ experience and has sold trotting horses to the value of $40,000. Some of his best sales were Dillon Boy, $10,000; Andrew Allison, $3,300; Lady Glenn, $2,000, Maud, $1,500, and Mambrino Bee, $1,500.

The trotting record for Missouri stallions is held by Dillon Boy, 2:09 1-4. This horse was bred and owned by Mr. Swaggard.

Other good breeders of standard-bred horses are John Burruss, Henry T. McElroy, S. M. Finley, W. H. Stephenson, E.
T. Letton & Son, H. D. Renter, G. E. Chinn, N. J. Coleman, J. R. Gentry, E. Knell, R. L. McDonald, J. F. Robinson, J.
D. Shewalter, H. B. Ayers, D. L. Bourn, G. M. Catron, and D. A Colyer.

   
DR. COX, OWNED BY J. C. CLARK, BUTLER.
   
OWNED BY WILLIAM DICE, MAYSVILLE.

* * *

(Missouri Jacks are not mentioned but many pictures of them were placed in the article.)

   
JUDGE C. M. DALBY AND JACK GROVER CLEVELAND.
   
JACKS, LIMESTONE VALLEY.
   
MORE JACKS, LIMESTONE VALLEY.
   
JACKS AT STATE FAIR—SEDALIA (left half of photo).
   
JACKS AT STATE FAIR—SEDALIA (right half of photo).

* * *

The mule is an indispensable draft animal in southern agriculture. The draft breeds of horses are as naught compared with him for continuous labor in the cotton and the corn. No modern war can be successfully carried forward without the mule.

Large-sized, well-proportioned and strongly-built mules are characteristic of Missouri.

   
MULE, VALLEY VIEW JACK FARM; 8 YEARS OLD. 19 HANDS HIGH, 1,900 POUNDS.

For this reason, when the British army sent its agents to the Western continent to buy mules, they established their distributing center at Lathrop, Missouri, and from this point were sent out 115,000 mules.

These mules, after serving with distinction throughout the Boer war, are now one of the most important factors in developing the agriculture of that region.

At the beginning of the war in the far East between Russia and Japan, a large consignment of mules was purchased in Missouri for the Russian army.

In the production of good mules the Missouri farmers have found out that large-sized and well-formed parents must be selected. The diminutive mules so often seen in certain parts of the south are not a profitable sort to produce.

The high quality maintained in Missouri mules is due to the extreme care exercised by the breeders of this class of animals. The average Missouri mule breeder is as careful in the selection of his mares for the production of mules as for any other class of horses.

Guyton & Harrington, Lathrop, maintained the largest horse-distributing barn in the world during the Boer war. During this war the company furnished 115,000 Missouri mules and 65,000 horses to the British Government.

   
PREPARING MULES FOR MARKET—R. R. BUCHNER, AUDRAIN COUNTY.
   
MULES AND CATTLE—W. A. ELGIN, PLATTE CITY.

* * *

The census for 1900 gives the number of swine in Missouri at 4.5 million. Secretary George B. Ellis, of the Board of Agriculture, values these at $45 million. Only two classes of animals, cattle and horses, have a higher total valuation than have domestic swine. The domestic hog is a stable product of the western farm.

Its ability to grow rapidly and economically have made it one of the most profitable animals for the small and large farmer alike.

The ordinary pig will produce from ten to fourteen pounds of pork for every bushel of corn fed. He will gain so rapidly that he can be sold at the maximum price at six months of age. Thus, money invested in hogs is rapidly returned.

   
LADY LEE L. 33469—N. H. GENTRY, SEDALIA.

While every important breed of hog is represented within, the borders of the State, the great majority of hogs belong to one of the three great breeds—the Poland-China, Berkshire, and Duroc-Jersey. There are probably more representatives of the Poland-China breed than all of the others combined.

This early-maturing breed has been in high favor for a very long period. They are distinctly a product of the corn belt of America. One of the most successful breeders in the State is F. M. Lail, of Marshall. This gentleman has been engaged in breeding Poland-China hogs 23 years, producing in that time more than 2,000 hogs. The total sum received for these animals is $40,000. One sow, Sally S., owned by this breeder has farrowed 100 pigs and these have been sold for $4,000. Five hogs sold by Mr. Lail brought $4,645.

Another well-known breeder of Poland-Chinas who has had over 20 years’ experience, is E. E. Axline, of Oak
Grove. This herd has produced over 4,000 animals which have sold for over $75,000. Four animals sold by this breeder brought $2,475.

Another breeder who has been in the business ten years is J. W. Breedlove, of LaBelle. This gentleman has produced 400 hogs which have sold for $8,000.

J. R. Young, of Richards, Missouri, has produced 350 hogs in seven years which have brought him $22,000. Five of his best hogs sold for $5,135.

Other successful breeders of Poland-China swine in Missouri are, T. W. Herbst, A. T. Grimes, B. W. Wallen, E. C. Branch, Sensintaffer Brothers, C. A. Griesenauer, Samuel Taylor, I. A. Novinger, B. B. Faires, B. II. Rodgers, W. B. Windsor, B. A. Hofstatler, D. D. Updike, R. W. Taylor, Burks & Brothers, Walter J. Sims, D. W. B. Kurtz, C. W. Stewart, T. G. Phelps, B. F. Risk, L. W. Monsees & Sons, Nelson Cole and J. B. Summers.

   
CHIEF D. F. 22445—D. F. RISK, WESTON.

The famous blue-grass pastures of Missouri have created a demand for a grazing hog. Breeders of Berkshires claim that their favorites are the most successful grazing animals among all the breeds of domestic swine. Certain it is that wherever they have been tried they have given great satisfaction to their owners.

Missouri enjoys the distinction of having one of the most famous Berkshire breeders in America. N. H. Gentry, of Sedalia, has successfully shown at the greatest fairs in the world and has perhaps sold more high-priced Berkshire hogs than any contemporary breeder.

At the Columbian Exposition Mr. Gentry won ten of the eighteen first prizes offered. Two other first prizes were won by a boar of Mr. Gentry’s breeding, and five other firsts were won by this distinguished breeder.

At the World’s Fair at New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1885, the Gentry Berkshires won all the first prizes offered on Berkshires, and also a $250 gold medal for the best herd of any age or breed. In 1903, 102 Berkshires were sold from this herd for $10,000.

Stock from this herd has been used in nearly every Berkshire herd of prominence in the United States and Canada. Shipments at different times have been made to foreign countries, including British West Indies, Cuba, and South America. It is generally conceded that Mr. Gentry has better bred Berkshires than have ever been imported from the old country.

The Breeders’ Gazette some years ago said that the history of the breed afforded no parallel to the success accomplished by this breeder in the improvement of the Berkshire breed. Lord Premier, for which $1,500 has been refused, is the greatest Berkshire boar living. He, his sire, his grandsire (the great Longfellow) were all bred at Wood Dale, the Gentry farm.

Other good breeders of Berkshires are Harris & McMahan, June K. King, John Morris, Evon Davies, E. C. Larch, James Price, Joseph Quesollo, F. A. Scott, William Brisky, and J. H. Riley.

   
ROSE HILL HERD OF DUROC-JERSEY SWINE—S. Y. THORNTON, BLACKWATER.

No breed of hogs has increased so rapidly in favor among Missouri stockmen as the Duroc-Jersey. This breed is prized particularly because of its great hardiness and prolificacy. Ten years ago the Duroc-Jersey was rarely found in the State. To-day there are more than 100 breeders, thus ranking next to Poland-Chinas in numbers in the State.

S. Y. Thornton has been breeding Duroc-Jerseys for nine years. In that time 602 animals have been sold for $13,000. During the three years, 412 head have sold for $9,300. The picture accompanying this article shows four of Mr. Thornton’s sows which together produced sixty-five pigs.

J. D. Stephenson has sold $10,000 worth of Duroc-Jerseeys in nine years.

Other men who breed Duroc-Jerseys are W. L. Addy, J. D. Stevenson, Harry Sneed, E. McFarland Bros., W. A. Mustain, C. Folgate, T. F. Johnston, A. F. Russell, J. C. Woodburn, D. L. Zumbro, S. G. Richards, Joseph Gibson and J. L. Condron.

   
JACK FROST, YOUNGEST MISSOURI BREEDER, WITH KING TOM, FIRST PRIZE BERKSHIRE UNDER SIX MONTHS. STATE FAIR.
   
THIN RIND HOGS—HERD OF W. F. DAVIS.

* * *

The business of breeding and feeding sheep is rapidly growing in this State. At the present time Missouri has a larger number of sheep than any adjoining State except Kentucky.

Some of the most famous breeders of Merino sheep in America are located in Missouri. At the Columbian Exposition, L. E. Shattuck, of Stanberry, took more first prizes than any other breeder. The Shattuck flock is now owned and successfully bred by E. B. Wilson, of Stanberry.

   
HAMPSHIRE RAM AND FAT LAMBS OWNED AND FED BY MISSOURI EXPERIMENT STATION.

The Bothwells, of Breckenridge, have been remarkably successful in the production of high-class Rambouillet sheep.

Shropshire sheep are bred by S. F. Huntsman, of Cairo; W. L. Smithy, Strother; Joseph Miller, of Granger; J. W. Boles, of Auxvasse; A. A. Alexander, Houstonia; I. H. Blood, Peru; E. C. Crouch, Blue Springs; L. N. Callison, Jamesport; H. Nance, Civil Bend; F. P. Paradise, Brookfield; M. P. DeWitt, Reger; E. W. Garrett, Sutherland; Grimes & Wilson, Monroe City; and H. C. Taylor, of Coping.

Approximately 200 men in this State own registered Shropshire rams. Cotswold sheep have been successfully handled for twenty years by Hopson Glasscock, of Oakwood. W. E. McFarland breeds Rambouillet sheep at Paris.

The climate, soil and good water render Missouri particularly adapted for the production of high-class sheep and, with the present rapidly increasing numbers, it will be but a short time when Missouri will rank with the best sheep States in the Union.

There are large areas of land in south Missouri that can be successfully used for the production of sheep.

   
COTSWOLD SHEEP—HOPSON GLASCOCK, OAKWOOD.
   
THE GUARDIAN OF THE FLOCK.

* * *

Much interest has been shown in the past two years in the breeding of goats. There are now in the State more than 31,000 head. These goats have been used on land where other live stock could not subsist. In many cases they have been successfully employed for the destruction of brush and weeds on pastures otherwise worthless.

   
ANGORA GOATS—ETMER FRAZER, MARYVILLE.

* * *

Missouri has won fame for her flocks and herds. Her people are by nature and training lovers of good stock. The State is located admirably for live stock growing. No other state surpasses it now and the splendid showing of its purebred animals points to its continued pre-eminence.

< Back to Top of Page