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  < Back to Table Of Contents  < Back to Topic: Modern vs. Vintage Farming

article number 386
article date 10-14-2014
copyright 2014 by Author else SaltOfAmerica
Cattle, the King of Your Missouri Livestock, 1904
by Walter Williams
   

From the 1904 book, The State of Missouri, an Autobiography. This book was commissioned for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition by the State of Missouri.

EDITORS NOTE: We were going to remove long lists of cattlemen’s names which appear throughout this section in order to make the reading smoother but decided that you the reader can spot such paragraphs and move on. Never know … someone may be looking for a great-grandpa’s name.

§

There are more than 50,000 head of pure bred registered cattle in the State. There are 4,000 bulls in the State which are registered. This means that ten per cent of the bulls are pure bred and registered.

The number of registered cattle are approximately:
- Shorthorn, 25,000;
- Herefords, 18,000;
- Aberdeen-Angus, 3,000;
- Galloways, 1,500;
- Jerseys, 1,500
- and all other breeds 1,500.

In every market of the world, Missouri cattle are known and their excellence is universally admitted.

   
WITH TRIPLET CALVES—HAMP B. WATTS, FAYETTE.
   
MISSOURI CHIEF 2653—M. E. MOORE, CAMERON.

If the sale records for the past ten years are evidence of high quality, then Missouri must be given a high place among the most famous breeding localities in the world. The results of the efforts of Missouri’s skillful cattle breeders have been appreciated. The records of sales show that forty-three head of Missouri cattle have sold for $95,000, over $2,000 per head.

Forty-three head sold for a total of $95,000 or an average of $2,200. Each of the 43 head sold for more than $1,500, while 19 sold for more than $2,000. Of these 13 were Herefords, 1 Galloway, 4 Aberdeen-Angus, and 25 Shorthorns.

* * *

Shorthorn cattle are sometimes called the Royal Family in the cattle world. In Missouri this old and popular breed has attained its highest development. Noble specimens of the breeders’ art, developed by skillful feeders, may be found in every county in the State. On every hand there are evidences of the power of this prepotent breed to improve the common stock of the country.

The Shorthorn breed of cattle is a monument to the intelligence of the British farmer. The rich pastures and favorable climate which these Shorthorns enjoyed in their native country is nowhere so well imitated as in the mild and equable climate and broad pastures of Missouri.

Missouri is one of the favored localities and the Missouri breeders of Shorthorns do not hesitate to maintain that there is no quality nor excellence that the nutritious herbage of this great commonwealth together with her equable climate can not duplicate.

The first Shorthorn cattle ever taken west of the Mississippi river were those taken to Cooper county, Missouri, by the late Nathaniel Leonard.

In 1839 this pioneer established the Ravenswood Herd of Shorthorn cattle which to this day is successfully breeding high class Shorthorns. It is said that his Shorthorn hull was pure white. Mr. Leonard purchased at the same time a heifer. These two animals together cost $1,100.

From these two animals many fine Shorthorns were produced which were shown at the early Missouri fairs.

   
SHORTHORNS—SANFORD SMITH, CARTHAGE.

Some famous breeders of Shorthorns in the early times were:

- Hutchinson, Warfield, Brand, Castleman and Wilson, of Cooper county;
- Larimore, of Callaway county;
- Hughes, Pettis county;
- Brown, Saline county;
- Doneghy, Jackson county;
- Hubbell, Ray county;
- Bryan, Ray county;
- Talley and Pilman, St. Charles county;
- McDonald, Grundy county;
- McHatton and Phillips, St. Louis county;
- Richard and William Gentry, Pettis county;
- Block, Pike county.

At a little later time the names of C. E. Leonard, Jeff Bridgeford, John G. Cowan, the Duncans and J. H. Kissinger became prominent in Shorthorn history. The missionary work of these pioneer breeders has resulted in distributing Shorthorn cattle throughout every portion of the State. There are at the present time 2,340 breeders of Shorthorn cattle in Missouri.

From June, 1902, to June, 1903, 5,610 calves were recorded from Missouri. This is one-eighth of the total number of animals recorded in the American Shorthorn Herd Book from the entire United States.

There are five Shorthorn bulls in the State of Missouri that have together produced 1,000 calves and these calves are valued at $115,000. Nonpareil Victor and Grand Victor, two Missouri bulls owned by Bothwell, have together produced 450 calves which are valued at $60,000.

Missouri breeders of Shorthorns report ten Shorthorn cows owned by T. J. Wornall, J. H. Novinger, June K. King, E. P. Wilkerson, Jeff Bridgeford, Purdy Brothers, John Harrison, and George Bothwell, as having produced 81 calves valued at $28,725.

   
DISTRIBUTION OE REGISTERED SHORTHORN CATTLE. FROM THE AMERICAN SHORTHORN HERD BOOK.

The prices which experienced breeders are willing to pay for highly improved cattle represents to a certain extent, their actual value. The Missouri Shorthorn breeders, Kissinger, Wallace, Bridgeford, Cowan, Towne, Bothwell and Wornall, have sold 13 Missouri Shorthorns for $27,840; this is an average of more than $2,000 per head.

C. D. Bellows reports that his sales of Shorthorn cattle from his own herd for thirty-six months immediately preceding November, 1903, averaged $1,000 per month.

The supreme test of quality comes when cattle contest in the show ring against the best bred animals of the world. Here Missouri Shorthorns hold a high place.

The breeding of pure-bred cattle is a profitable business. Seven Missouri breeders, Wornall, Burruss, Novinger, King, Wallace, Bridgeford and Purdy Brothers, report having sold 2,600 animals for $345,000. To this list can be added the names of Bothwell, Leonard, Gentry, Harned, Bellows, Casey and hundreds of others.

Not only the large breeders who invest thousands of dollars and advertise extensively, but the smaller dealers also find the breeding of Shorthorn cattle a profitable venture. Mr. T. J. Payne, of Sweet Springs, Missouri, purchased the Shorthorn cow, Woodford Belle III in 1888 for $32.50. Re has sold ten of her offspring for $1,100 and has now on hand ten head worth $1,100.

* * *

   
IMPERIAL WANDERER’S LASS 158478—GEO. U. ROTHWELL, NETTLETON.
   
NONPARIEL OF CLOVER BLOSSOM—GEO. U. ROTHWELL, NETTLETON.

* * *

Missouri possesses more registered Herefords than any other State in the Union. She has, in fact, nearly twice as many representatives of this popular breed of cattle as Iowa, Illinois, Kansas or Nebraska. One-fifth of all the registered Herefords in America are owned in Missouri. Five of the ten highest priced Herefords ever sold in the world were produced and sold by Missouri breeders.

The breeders of Missouri Herefords have easily distanced all competitors in the production of high class cattle. Whether we measure their successes by show yard victories, or from the standpoint of the prices received at the great auction sales, Missouri must be given: a high rank among Hereford cattle breeders.

   
FIRST PRIZE HEREFORDS—S. L. BROCK, MACON.

The breeders of this State occupy a strategic position in reference to the markets of this country:
- They are almost in the center of the great corn growing and cattle feeding district.
- They are located at the very gateway of the great western range country.
- They are also within easy reach of the southwest cattle country which absorbs thousands of our best breeding animals.

The Missouri Hereford breeder has been quick to take advantage of this favorable circumstance. Missouri Herefords are scattered all over the west and southwest. The attractive white faces of this wonderfully prepotent breed of beef cattle are found in thousands of feed lots in the great Middle West.

The enterprise of the Hereford breeders of this State has made them formidable rivals of the Shorthorn, Aberdeen-Angus, and Galloway breeds. Seven Herefords sold by Armour, Gabbert, Harris, Rennolds and Sotham brought $28,650, an average of more than $4,000 each.

In addition to those mentioned above, Armour, Funkhouser, Gabbert, Harris, Spelman and Sotham sold 15 other animals for $20,000, an average of over $1,300 each.

Seven Hereford bulls in the State of Missouri have produced together 1,453 calves worth $439,010.
- Funkhouser’s bull ‘March On VI’ has produced 437 calves valued at $88,000.
- Gabbert’s bull ‘Columbus’ has produced 113 calves valued at $61,000.
- Sotham’s bull ‘Corrector’ has to his credit 189 calves valued at $78,000.
- Harris’ best bull ‘Benjamin Wilton’ has sired 200 calves with a total value of $75,000.

Other breeders in the State who have made good records are Wehrman, Dette Brothers, Flock, Boney, Lamb, Spelman, Shirkey, Baskett, Swianey and Taylor.

   
NUMBER OF REGISTERED HEREFORDS SOLD WITH AMOUNT RECEIVED.

Many of the best Hereford breeders in the State have begun with one cow. It is interesting to know what some of the larger breeders of the State have received from the produce of some of their best cows. Armour, Gabbert, Harris, Sotham and Funkhouser report that nine cows owned by them produced a total of 85 calves, and these 85 calves were valued at $72,620—each of these breeders having owned a cow whose produce brought more than $5,000.

The amount of money paid for highly bred Hereford cattle in the State of Missouri is very large. The combined sales of seven Missouri Hereford breeders represent a total of over $1 million, and six of the breeders report having sold over 5,500 animals.

It must not be supposed that success in breeding high class cattle is attained only by the large breeders. Many men have started with one or two animals and have achieved very satisfactory results.

J. C. Hartzier, of East Lynne, bought twin Hereford heifers nine years ago. He has sold during the time $3,145 worth of stock and has now on hand sixty head of cattle. George Ess, of Clark, Missouri, bought one cow eight years ago and has since sold twelve animals for $1,250.

No other breed of cattle ever handled in the State of Missouri has had a more successful show yard career than the Hereford breed. In every great stock show of recent years, Missouri Herefords have won the lion’s share of prizes. At the International and State Fairs for the last fifteen years Missouri Herefords have won 563 first and champion prizes.

No other State in America has ever won so many prizes on Hereford cattle in the same length of time. During the first four years the existence of the great international Live Stock Show at Chicago, Missouri breeders made 251 entries in the Hereford classes. This is more than one-third of all the entries made at the same show by all the States and Canada combined.

   
PRIZE HEREFORDS—O. HARRIS, SULLIVAN COUNTY.

The records of the Hereford Association show that Kansas stands next to Missouri in the registration of Hereford calves, but Missouri has successfully exhibited eight times as many cattle at Chicago. Not only has Missouri been largely represented in the Hereford classes at Chicago, but she has taken more first and champion prizes than all the States and Canada combined.

With a little more than one-third of the cattle exhibited she has won more than half of all the first and championship prizes. During the whole history of the International Show, Missouri has carried off 50 of the 84 first and championship prizes given to Hereford cattle. At the same show for the same period Missouri took exactly half of all the second prizes offered.

   
NUMBER OF HEREFORD CATTLE EXHIBITED BY FIVE LEADING STATES AT ALL INTERNATIONAL SHOWS.

She has, therefore, won more championship, first and second prizes than all the rest of the North American Continent combined. It is, therefore, no cause for surprise that five of the ten highest priced Herefords in America were Missouri Herefords.

   
NUMBER OF FIRST AND CHAMPION PRIZES WON BY MISSOURI HEREFORDS AT ALL INTERNATIONAL SHOWS IN COMPETITION WITH THE WORLD.

Gudgell & Simpson, of Independence, Missouri, maintain one of the largest breeding establishments in the world. These gentlemen were successful exhibitors at the World’s Fair in Chicago and have sold perhaps a larger number of registered Herefords than any other one firm. This firm has exhibited more pure-bred and grade Herefords in the fat classes at the great national shows than any other in Missouri.

Other large Hereford breeders are Sheridan Henry, J. R. Law, J. M. Harman, Yates Brothers, S. L. Standish, W. S. Grubbs, J. M. Rennolds, C. B. Smith, S. L. Brock and Missouri Agricultural College.

   
HEREFORDS—GUDGELL & SIMPSON, INDEPENDENCE.
   
HEREFORDS, W. B. WADDELL, LEXINGTON; C. G. COMSTOCK AND SON, ALBANY.

* * *

   
OWNED BY C. D. BELLOWS, MARYVILLE.
   
FIRST PRIZE HERD, STATE FAIR, 1903—T. J. WORNALL & SON, LIBERTY.

* * *

The breeders of Aberdeen-Angus cattle in Missouri claim that their cattle have succeeded in topping the Christmas market oftener than any other breed.

In the fourteen years ending with 1903, Aberdeen-Angus cattle topped the Christmas market 13 times. The feeders and breeders of Angus cattle in Missouri furnished six of these market-topping loads. The men who fed these cattle were Hudson, Brandon, White and Eubank.

Thus, Missouri has furnished practically half of the market-topping cattle of the United States for the last fourteen years. It is interesting to note in this connection that five of the market-topping loads of fat cattle from Missouri were fed by Carroll county feeders at Carrollton, Missouri.

It is also significant that nearly all of these high selling cattle were sired by Imported Kabul, a well-bred “Pride” bull by Young Viscount. Among the sons of Kabul was the Erica bull ‘El Rey,’ who was so long at the head of W. H. Elliot’s herd. The dam of ‘Paragon of Estill,’ the Junior Champion bull of 1890, was also a daughter of Imported Kabul.

   
ABERDEEN-ANGUS—W. J. TURPIN, CARROLLTON.
   
DISTBIBUTION OF REGISTERED ABERDEEN-ANGUS CATTLE. FROM THE OFFICIAL HERD BOOK.

In the show ring, the Missouri Aberdeen-Angus enjoys the reputation of having successfully won the best prizes more continuously than any other breed in this State. The victorious show yard career of Wallace Estill in competition with the world has perhaps seldom been equalled. For five years he was never defeated by any other Angus herd.

At the World’s Fair in Chicago he won nine out of thirteen first prizes offered. At the dispersion sale of this herd, 72 head of cattle sold for an average of $580. This is the highest average price ever recorded for Angus cattle in America. Black Knight, of Estill and Lucia Estill sold for $2,100 and $2,800 respectively. These two are among the six highest priced Aberdeen-Angus cattle ever sold in this country.

The produce from five Aberdeen-Angus cows owned by Rea, Andrews, England, Hadley and Orear, sold for $9,750, an average of nearly $2,000 per cow. James H. Rea reports having sold 308 head of cattle for $38,500.

Some breeders have found the breeding of Aberdeen-Angus cattle a very profitable venture. L. F. Hadley, of Ford City, bought $400 worth of Aberdeen-Angus foundation stock in February, 1897. In December of the same year he sold all but two of the calves produced from these animals for $450.

That Aberdeen-Angus cattle have not lost their great fecundity may be seen from the following reports of some of her best breeders:
- Joseph H. Rea reports having owned a cow that produced 14 calves which were valued at $2,500.
- A cow owned by W. M. England dropped 10 calves valued at $1,500.
- George W. Hadley’s best cow produced 13 calves valued at $1,500.
- John P. Greer at one time possessed an Angus cow that in her lifetime gave birth to 14 calves which were valued at $3,000.

The prices that have been received for Missouri Aberdeen-Angus cattle show that there is profit in this hardy and early maturing breed. Culver, Rea, Andrews and Hadley sold 19 head of Angus cattle for $5,000.

Some noted Angus bulls that have been owned in Missouri are Imported Bush Ranger and Estill Eric, both owned by Elliott and Estill. Polar Star, a bull owned by H. W. Elliott has sired more recorded calves than any Angus bull in America for the same period. Among the herd headers produced from this bull were Bunce, Lengthy Duke, He’s a Hero, He’s a Star, and Ermoor.

   
ANGUS CATTLE AND POLAND-CHINA HOGS—HOMER CATTERSON, MARYVILLE.

The Angus cattle have ever been favorites in the feed yard, owing to their vigor, thrift and early maturing qualities, and while they do not exist in such large numbers in the State as some of the other beef animals, they have ever been popular with the handlers of beef cattle everywhere.

Other noted breeders of Angus cattle in Missouri are W. J. Turpin, Joseph E. Withers, John F. Coulter, Omer Catterson, Berry Lucas, R. S. Williams, E. E. Axline, N. R. Tracy, J. E. Creel, W. M. England and Elm Park Cattle Company.

* * *

   
ISAAC 177880 AND MISS POLLY 177881, AGED EIGHT WEEKS—MRS. G. C. MOSHER, KANSAS CITY.
   
CATTLE-—FRED B. PARSONS KNOX COUNTY.

* * *

The wonderful adaptability of Missouri’s soil and climate to the production of all kinds of live stock is nowhere better illustrated than in the successful breeding and handling of the sturdy Galloway breed. This hardy and vigorous breed of cattle from the bleak climate of Scottland has thrived wondrously on our rich pasture and generous feed.

The first Galloways ever imported into Missouri were brought here by A. B. Matthews. According to the Secretary of the Galloway Association there were recorded in the United States in the year ending June 1, 1903, 2,006 Galloway cattle. Of these 343 were recorded from Missouri.

In other words, Missouri owns one-sixth of all the Galloways in America. At a conservative estimate there are 1,500 head of registered Galloway cattle in the State.

   
GALLOWAYS—W. M. BROWN & SON, CARROLLTON.

One of the largest and most successful breeders of these good cattle in the United States is C. N. Moody, of Atlanta, Missouri. During the last seven years Mr. Moody has sold 300 registered Galloways for approximately $30,000; two of these sold for $2,615, and six sold for a total of $5,240. The prizes won by this breeder in three years amount to $3,800.

One cow in this herd produced 5 calves valued at $2,100. The owner of this herd bought McDougal, the highest priced Galloway bull ever sold in the world. Some of the leading breeders in the State not mentioned above are W. M. Brown & Son, H. H. Harris, J. M. Lowe, M. R. Platt, L. M. Winslow, F. P. Wild, I. C. Huntington, J. B. Thompson, and Philo Lasher.

   
FEEDING CATTLE—TURNER MCBAINE, BOONE COUNTY.
GALLOWAYS—C. N. MOODY, ATLANTA.
SHORTHORNS, C. 0. BELLOWS, MARYVILLE.

* * *

The development of dairy breeds of cattle is naturally co-extensive with the highest development of the dairy industry. In the eastern and northern States where dairying is the principal industry, we should expect to find the dairy breeds flourishing and numerous.

In Missouri, where the production of beef is of primary importance, we would expect to find the highest types of beef breeds. This is in fact the case, but while Missouri does not rank with some other States in extent of her dairy industry, yet in the production of dairy cattle she has been unusually successful.

One of the largest and most successful exhibitors of dairy cattle is M. B. Moore, of Cameron, Missouri, a breeder of Holstein-Friesian cattle. This gentleman has for twenty years been breeding, handling and showing this highly efficient dairy breed, producing in that time 544 animals. The total sum received for these animals was $67,485. The total sum received for the five best animals was $5,000.

   
HOLSTIEINS, FIRST PRIZE, STATE FAIR.—M. E. MOORE, CAMERON, MISSOURI.

But the most remarkable success perhaps of this breeder was in competition with the best cattle of this breed at the leading national and international shows of America. This successful exhibitor has won 800 first prizes and $16,755 in money premiums. In the year 1890 he won $2,000 in premiums.

His best bull produced 150 animals that were valued at $3,250. The best cow produced 8 young which were valued at $3,000. In addition to the above, this famous herd has won seven silver cups and thirty medals.

One of his most widely known cows is ‘Shady Brook Gerben’ whose official butter test was 23 pounds in seven days. This cow made four pounds of butter in one day, and wherever shown, won every first prize offered for butter test at every Western State Fair, also at St. Louis and Atlanta, Georgia.

Holstein-Friesians are also bred in Missouri by the Missouri Agricultural College, John Clancy, Joseph Barmann and William McWilliams.

   
BROWN SWISS CATTLE—HARRY MCCULLOUGH, FAYETTE.

* * *

The popular Jersey breed of cattle is well represented in the State. E. J. Shelpman, a breeder of Springfield, Missouri, has sold 210 Jerseys in 15 years for a total sum of $42,000. Five of his best animas sold for $3,200.

Five of his best cows produced 35,000 pounds of milk and 1,900 pounds of butter in one year. The best milk record from a member of this herd is 8,500 pounds.

One of the best producing Jersey herds is owned by S. W. Coleman, of Sedalia. Missouri. He maintains a herd of from 6 to 10 cows, half of which are two years old, and this herd produces an average of 400 pounds of butter per year, every pound of which sells readily at 25 cents the year around, thus making an average of $100 to the cow. The best cow in this herd produced 9,600 pounds of milk which made 500 pounds of butter in one year.

   
JERSEY CALF—L. E. SHATTUCK, STANBERRY.

Another herd of Jerseys is owned by Dr. T. A. Still, of Kirksville, Missouri. This is an excellent herd of highly bred cattle.

The Missouri Agricultural College maintains an excellent herd of pure bred Jerseys and Holstein cattle. Eight cows in this fine herd produce more than 400 pounds each per annum. One, May Bates 108674 A. J. C. C., produced 500 pounds of butter in 1903. The annual income from each of 15 cows in this herd is $125.

Other Missouri men who breed Jerseys are: D. L. Bartlett, Michel Hilgert, Rolla Oliver, H. O. Lewelling and T. E. Wardell.

   
JERSEYS—ROLLO OLIVER, DEARBORN.

* * *

   
CORRECTOR.
   
EXILE OF SPRING LAWN 46304, SHELPMAN & HEADLEY, SPRINGFIELD.

* * *

Every important breed of cattle is represented in the State. Red Polled cattle are successfully bred by L. T. Henry, of Eolia, Missouri, T. N. Flournoy, Shannon Staten, David Cady, and D. D. Updyke. The latter breeder has sold thirty-six animals in eight years for a total of $3,840.

Missouri fat cattle have sold for the highest price on the Christmas market six out of fourteen times in the past few years. If it were possible to determine the best loads of cattle sold throughout the year, Missouri would undoubtedly have a larger proportion of high priced cattle than any State in the Union.

This State has ever been foremost in the finishing of high class cattle for the fat stock markets. The enormous areas of corn, blue grass pasture and hay have made it possible to place on the market highly finished products.

   
SECTIONAL VIEW OF ST. JOSEPH STOCK YARDS.

The methods by which cattle are fed and ultimately finished for the consumer are well illustrated in Missouri. The most important class of cattle feeders are those who buy thin cattle or stockers, feed them for a short period on grain and bay or pasture, and sell them on the market.

A careful investigation of the methods employed by this class of feeders show that forty per cent of all the cattle thus purchased for fattening are two years old. Thirty-four per cent of the remainder are from two to three years old.

The average number of days during which these cattle are fed a full ration of corn is 180. The weight of the cattle at the beginning of the feeding period is 1,367.

   
CATTLE FEEDING—W. E. MUIR, CALLAWAY COUNTY.

The grain ration fed in a great majority of cases is shelled corn. In certain districts cottonseed meal is used to supplement the corn. Timothy hay, wheat straw, oat straw, flax straw, corn stover, millet, sorghum, and clover hay are all used as roughness.

These methods have been greatly influenced in recent years by investigations carried on at the Missouri Experiment Station. Under the efficient direction of Dr. H. J. Waters these cattle feeding experiments have been conducted for eight years. These experiments have included a careful test of all the principal feeding methods employed in the State together with more profitable methods which have been determined by the Station.

That this Station has been successful in the production of well finished beef cattle can be seen from the fact that the highest priced load of beef cattle sold in the Chicago market in the year 1903 was fed at the Missouri Experiment Station.

Some of the experiments conducted at this Station are of the greatest economic importance.

In one experiment in feeding cattle in the winter it was found that with a ration of six pounds of corn and sixteen pounds of timothy hay each animal gained one pound per day.

Another lot of cattle of the same age and condition gained exactly two pounds per day on exactly six pounds of corn and seventeen pounds of clover hay.

In general it has been found that any nitrogenous roughness like clover hay, cowpea hay, or alfalfa hay has increased very materially, the efficiency of the ration fed, and in every case has increased the profit.

   
COOPER COUNTY CATTLE SCENE. Photograph by Max Schmidt, Boonville.

The State has not neglected to provide splendid facilities for instruction and investigation in Animal Husbandry. The Missouri College of Agriculture maintains a farm of 600 acres, well stocked with cattle, sheep, and swine. Typical specimens of Shorthorn, Hereford, Aberdeen-Angus, Jersey, and Holstein cattle are continually maintained for purposes of instruction.

Thorough instruction is offered by this institution in Stock Breeding, in the history and development of breeds, and in feeds and feeding. Much attention is given to the judging of animals for the selection of profitable types. All students in Animal Husbandry receive a course in Veterinary Science which treats of the common diseases and methods of treatment of the domestic animals.

The investigations conducted by the Missouri Experiment Station have been of incalculable benefit to the farmers of the State. The experiments in cattle feeding have attracted wide attention and have had much to do with fixing many of the profitable feeding methods in the State.

The discovery of Dr. J. W. Connaway, of this Station, that by a simple method of inoculation, cattle could be made immune to the Texas or splenetic fever, has opened up a large and profitable market for Missouri cattle.

The Live Stock Laboratory, located on the College Farm is a stone building devoted to instruction in Veterinary Science and investigations in Animal Breeding. It contains also a large and well-lighted judging pavilion in which the stock judging exercises are conducted.

   
CATTLE FROM THE MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FARM.
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