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  < Back to Table Of Contents  < Back to Topic: Automotive … Planes and Trains Too

article number 581
article date 08-11-2016
copyright 2016 by Author else SaltOfAmerica
Prelude to the Indy 500; the 1910 Fourth of July Indianapolis Motor Speedway Races
by 1910 Automobile Magazine Staff
   

From the July 7 issue of ‘The Automobile’ magazine.

* * *

INDIANAPOLIS. July 1, 1910.

For the second time this summer the Indianapolis Motor Speedway opened its gates this afternoon, and despite the excellent card provided a crowd of 6,000 people was lost in the grandstands.

This July meet was of a more attractive nature than its predecessor in May for the reason that it had a number of the trophies up for competition including the Cobe Cup, the G & J Trophy, the Remy Brassard, and the Speedway Helmet. Two of these were down for decision this afternoon, one of them being the G & J Trophy, which was won by Bob Burman in a Marquette-Buick.

The Speedway Helmet offered in the free-for-all at 10 miles, and which was won in May by Bob Burman, was captured this time by Eddie Hearne of Chicago, driving the 120-Benz.

It was a day of sensational record breaking, new marks being established in nearly every one of the stock car events. In the time trials Bob Burman, driving the Buick Special, set 1-4-mile mark at 8.5 seconds, an average of 105.87 miles an hour. In the 160-inch class, Herreshoff in a Herreshoff established a new mark of 5:30.61 for this division.

Louis Chevrolet in a Buick reduced the 161-230 cubic inch class, 5-mile figures from 4:4I.77 to 4:40.8, his own record.

In the 231-300 cubic inch class Burman in the Marquette-Buick smashed the 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50-mile records in the long-distance race for the G & J Trophy. His times were:
10 miles - 8:14.4, previous 8:16.8,
20 miles - 16:21.5, previous 17:10.7
30, miles - 24:17.1, previous 26 :06.11
40 miles - 32:06.5, previous 34:25.4
50 miles - 40:03.1, previous 42:03.0

In the 301-450 cubic inch class Burman in the Marquette-Buick also cut the 10-mile record from 7:57.1 to 7:56.45, and established a record for 15 miles at 11:46.4.

Another demonstration of place was made by Hearne in the Benz in the Helmet race, in which his 10 miles in 7:13, average 83.14 miles per hour.

The G&J Trophy race attracted a field of eleven cars which included Burman and Louis Chevrolet in Marquette-Buicks, Pearce and Heineman in Falcars, Fox in a Pope-Hartford, Harroun and Dawson in Marmons, Moore and Davis in Great Westerns,Miller a Warren-Detroit, and Cook in a Black Crow. Chevrolet cut out the pace at the start and held the lead for 10 miles, when Burman, sore at being beaten for the Helmet by Hearne zipped to the front and set a merry clip for his team-mate.

Chevrolet, however, was not beaten so easily and at the 25-mile post his number lead the others on the score board. Shortly after this, however, Burman again gained command, and from that point on held his field in check. All the way, however, he was grimly pursued by Chevrolet.

Burman, however, had plenty up his sleeve and nearing the finish he felt so safe that he stopped at the pits to take on a supply of gasoline and oil. Even with this he had enough left to beat out Chevrolet by 4 seconds.

Pearce in a Falcar had stuck to his task like a veteran and as a result of his perseverance he brought his car home in third place, just ahead of Fox in a Pope-Hartford. In fifth place was Heineman in the other Falcar, while the other two cars that finished the race were the Great Westerns driven by Moore and Davis.

Dawson in a Marmon stopped at 45 miles. Miller in the Warren-Detroit went 25 miles, while Harroun in a Marmon and Cook in a Black Crow stopped in their third lap.

   
Joe Dawson with his Marmon on the bricks of Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Striving for the Speedway Helmet were Zengel in the Chadwick, Hearne in the Benz, Ireland in a Stoddard, Harroun in a Marmon, Louis Chevrolet in a Buick Special, and Wilcox in the Simplex. Burman and Aitken, although entered, did not answer the call the first time, and got out on the track just as the field was breaking for the flying start. It was called no start, however, so Aitken and Burman lined up with the others on the next trial.

The early stages of the battle proved a struggle between the National and the Benz, and these two led past the judges’ stand on the second lap. Chevrolet’s Buick and the Simplex had dropped while Harroun, Zengel, and Ireland were bringing up in the rear. Hearne after this assumed command, having taken the lead away from Aitken who had turned the 5 miles in 3:40.3.

Harroun was runner up, but despite his best efforts he could not catch his fellow Chicagoan, who won the race handily with the Chadwick in third place and the Stoddard fourth.

In the minor events Chevrolet in the Buick was the star, winning twice, while his teammate Burman, in the Marquette Buick, also captured first place honors. The Alco driven by Grant made its debut as a Speedway candidate and won handily while other firsts went to the Herreshoff in its class, and the Maytag in the handicap.

   
Burman and Arthur Chevrolet Fighting It out on Turn.

INDIANAPOLIS, July 2, 1910.

More records were smashed on the second day of the meet, the feature of which was the 100-mile race for the Remy Brasserd, which was captured by Burman in the Marquette-Buick, with Dawson in a Marmon second, Harroun in Marmon third, and Arthur Chevrolet in a Marquette-Buick fourth.

Burman made a remarkable drive of it, going the century without a stop in 1:20:35.6, as against the previous record of 1:23.43 made by Kincade in a National in the Prest-O-Lite race last May.

Thirteen cars started in this classic and it proved to be a battle between the Marmon and the Marquette-Buick. If points had been counted the Marmon would have captured the honors, but they weren’t so the glory goes to Burman, who, however, had to drive his best in order to beat out the new start, Dawson, by a scant 5 seconds.

The field that came to the tape included, besides these four, Kincade in a National, Pearce in a Falcar, Cook in a Black Crow, Moore in the Great Western, Louis Chevrolet in a Buick, Stinson in a Black Crow, Aitken and Wilcox in Nationals and Davis in a Great Western.

   
Altken In the National “60” Cutting for the Front.

Kincade in the National made a bold bid for the race in the early stages, and for 30 miles he showed the speed of the party. Then Burman went to the front and flashed first past the tape at 40 and 50 miles. Sixty miles saw a new leader, when Dawson in the Marmon assumed command, holding the pace until past 70 miles.

Then Burman came up again and, although grimly pursued by Dawson, the remainder of the distance he held his own and at the end had enough to gain the decision by only a narrow margin. Dawson made a plucky fight of it, but what hurt his chances was the stop he made at the end of the seventh lap for slight repairs which enabled Burman to go to the front.

In the next to the last lap Dawson managed to pick up 8 seconds on Burman, but the man in the Marquette-Buick was not to be denied, and dashed across the tape with the speed of a cannon ball. He had covered the:
- 40 miles in 31:46.02,
- 50 miles in 39:47.86,
- 80 miles in 64:24.48,
- 90 miles in 1:12:27.84 and
- 100 miles in 1:20:35.63.

All of these were new records for the301-450 class. Dawson in the Marmon landed the 60-mile record in 48:15.29, and the 70-mile in 56:05.65.

Burman in the Buick Special carried off the honors in the mile time trials which opened the day’s sport, showing 58:35 for the sprint, which was faster than Aitken in the National, Hearne in the Benz, Robertson in the Simplex, Wilcox in the Simplex, and Merz in the Empire could do.

In the races that followed, Robertson in Herreshoff, Chevrolet in the Buick and Marquette- Buick, and Grant in the Alco were among the winners. The Greiner National and the Aitken National also scored, while the handicap was won by George Robertson in the Simplex.

Aitken’s victory was in the free-for-all, in which he defeated a choice field which included Robertson in a Simplex, Hearne in the Benz, Wilcox in the Simplex, Zengel in the Chadwick, and Burman in the Buick Special.

   
Louis Chevrolet, Last Year’s Winner, Stops for Gasoline.

INDIANAPOLIS, July 4, 1910.

It was indeed a well-satisfied throng that witnessed the wind-up of the three-day race meet on Monday, the Fourth of July, and a most befitting sane Fourth celebration it proved to be.

Event No. 2, a 10-mile race for cars in the 161-230 cubic inch class, was put on first to try out the track. There were six starters in this race, including Sutcliffe in a Maytag, Kenyon in a Fuller, Miller in a Warren-Detroit, Endicott in an E-M-F, Louis Chevrolet in a Buick, and Burman in a Buick.

Sutcliffe, Endicott, and Burman got away together in this event, but the end of the first lap found Chevrolet in the lead, with Burman about 50 yards behind him, with the rest stringing along about 100 yards behind him. The race was a romp for Chevrolet and for Burman, the former finishing first in 9:12.23, and the latter second.

Event No. 1 was next with three Herreshoff cars driven by Roberts, McCormick and Herreshoff as starters. It was a 5-mile event for stock-chassis cars of Class B, Division 1, having 161-cubic inches piston displacement or under. Roberts took the lead in this event and was ahead by about 200 yards at the end of the first lap, and at the finish he stretched the distance to about 300 yards, with Herreshoff second and McCormick a slow third. The time was 5:32.87.

Event No. 3 was a 5-mile race for stock-chassis cars with a piston displacement of 231-300 cubic inches. Seven cars lined up for the start in this event, with Fox in a Pope-Hartford, Moore in the Great Western, Davis in a Great Western, Cook in a Black Crow, Stinson in a Black Crow, Heineman in a Falcar and Pearce in a Falcar.

While these cars were lined up, and before the race was started, the Remy Trophy, and the Remy Grand Brassard, won in the 100-mile race Saturday, were presented to Robert Burman.

Pearce’s Falcar got away first at the start, but Heineman immediately forged ahead and took the lead, while Moore killed his engine at the start and dropped out of the race. Heineman won in this event, with Pearce second, and Stinson third. The time was 4:44.31.

   
Line-up for the 200 mile Cobe Trophy race.

Cobe Trophy Was Then Competed For.

At 3:10 in the afternoon fourteen cars lined up for the Cobe Trophy race, the big event of the afternoon, which was open to all stock-chassis cars having 600 cubic inches piston displacement or less. The distance was 200 miles.

The fourteen starters included Wilcox in a National, Fox in a Pope-Hartford, Kincaid in a National, Aitken in a National, Cook in a Black Crow, Stinson in a Black Crow, Harvey in a National, Grant in an Alco, Harroun in a Marmon, Dawson in a Marmon, Louis Chevrolet in a Marquette-Buick, Burman in a Marquette-Buick, Arthur Chevrolet in a Marquette-Buick, Pearce in a Falcar, and Wishard in a Mercedes-Simplex.

Arthur Chevrolet in a Marquette-Buick led the field at the end of 10 miles, closely pursued by Burman and Kincaid. Burman led till the 180th mile, when the Dawson Marmon swung into the lead and was never headed.

   
Just After the Start in the Cobe Trophy Race.

Details of the Doings on July Fourth.

Event 1, stock chassis cars, Class B, Division 1—160 cubic inches piston displacement and under. Distance, 5 miles.

   
Event 1, stock chassis cars, Class B, Division 1—160 cubic inches piston displacement and under. Distance, 5 miles.

Event 2, stock cars, Class B, Division 2—161-230 cubic inches piston displacement. Distance. 10 miles.

   
Event 2, stock cars, Class B, Division 2—161-230 cubic inches piston displacement. Distance. 10 miles.

Event 3, stock chassis cars, Class B, Division 3—231-300 cubic inches piston displacement. Distance, 5 miles.

   
Event 3, stock chassis cars, Class B, Division 3—231-300 cubic inches piston displacement. Distance, 5 miles.

Event 4—Not run. Scratched from program.

Event 5, stock chassis cars, Class E—Opened only to registered amateur drivers in accordance with definition of racing rules of the A. A. A. Distance, 5 miles.

   
Event 5, stock chassis cars, Class E—Opened only to registered amateur drivers in accordance with definition of racing rules of the A. A. A. Distance, 5 miles

Event 6. Cars Class D—Free-for-all open race. Open to all cars entered at the meet. Distance, 20 miles.

   
Event 6. Cars Class D—Free-for-all open race. Open to all cars entered at the meet. Distance, 20 miles.

* * *
Results of the 200 mile stock chassis, Cobe Trophy Race are given in the next 3 pictures. CLICK ON BUTTON BELOW THE PICTURE FOR A READABLE SIZE.

   
Miles 0 – 80. Click Button Below Photo For Readable Size. 1910 Coby Trophy 200 mile race results: Miles 0 – 80.
1310x352 size available. to open in new window.

   
Miles 90 – 130. Click Button Below Photo For Readable Size. 1910 Coby Trophy 200 mile race results: Miles 90 – 130.
969x292 size available. to open in new window.

   
Miles 140 – 200. Click Button Below Photo For Readable Size. 1910 Coby Trophy 200 mile race results: Miles 140 – 200.
1281x292 size available. to open in new window.

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